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  1. Sycuan Cultural Night May 15, 2018 - by NaepcA1 (Posted Wed, 18 Apr 2018 15:45:39 GMT)
    Dear Friends and Colleagues:

    I am hoping you may be interested in attending the Sycuan Cultural Night or coordinating a tribal school or youth group to attend the events. Please see the attached flyers as there are 2 different events. (1) During the days of May 15th and 16th, schools and youth groups are invited to visit. Space is limited. (2) The evening of May 15th is the Sycuan Cultural Night event. Please RSVP for all events to 619-445-6917.

    The Sycuan Cultural Center along with the Kumeyaay Diegueño Land Conservancy and the Indian Land Tenure Foundation will be hosting the Lummi Nation and their Totem Pole Journey from Washington State to Florida on May 15th and 16th. Tokita, the Orca whale was taken from the Salish Sea 47 years ago has remained in captivity in a small concrete tank at the Miami Sea Aquarium. The Lhaq'temish or Lummi Nation have shared the Salish Sea with their relatives, the killer whale (Blackfish), and are trying to bring her back to her home waters, her family, especially to her mother, and to her waters of the Salish Sea. Please see the attached flyers as there are 2 different events. (1) During the days of May 15th and 16th, schools and youth groups are invited to visit. Space is limited. (2) The evening of May 15th is the Sycuan Cultural Night event. Please RSVP for all events to 619-445-6917.


    Lisa C. Haws
    Cultural Resource Manager
    Sycuan Band of the Kumeyaay Nation

    Assistant Executive Director
    Kumeyaay Diegueño Land Conservancy

    (619) 733-7697 (cell)
    (619) 312-1935 (direct dial to desk)
    (619) 445-6917 Ext. 105 (office)
    lhaws@sycuan-nsn.gov


  2. CWA 319 Grants Due May 2, 2018 - by NaepcA1 (Posted Wed, 18 Apr 2018 15:44:19 GMT)
    On March 21, 2018 EPA posted the FY2018 Request for Proposals from Indian Tribes and Intertribal Consortia for Nonpoint Source Management Grants Under Clean Water Act (CWA) Section 319. Information about the RFP is available on EPA’s Tribal NPS Competitive Grant website. EPA is soliciting proposals from eligible tribes and intertribal consortia to develop and/or implement watershed-based plans and implement watershed projects that will result in significant steps towards solving Nonpoint Source (NPS) impairments on a watershed-wide basis.

    • Who is eligible to apply? All tribes eligible to receive CWA Section 319 grants may apply. Here is a current list of eligible tribes. As a reminder, tribes submitting base 319 grant workplans may also apply for a competitive 319 grant in the same year.
    • When are proposals due? Proposals are due on May 2, 2018 by 11:59 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time (EDT), 10:59 P.M. Central Daylight Time (CDT), 9:59 P.M. Mountain Daylight Time (MDT), or 8:59 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time (PDT).
    • Where do tribes apply? Tribes must submit proposals via the Grants.gov Workspace. Please see the RFP for additional information about submitting a proposal to Grants.gov.
    • Questions? Visit EPA’s web page for a list of Frequently Asked Questions. Tribes may also submit questions about the FY2018 RFP to tribal319grants@epa.gov. Questions about the RFP must be submitted in writing via email and must be received by April 20, 2018.

    For more information contact:
    Karen Gude
    Tribal Program Coordinator
    U.S. EPA/Office of Water
    Phone: (202) 564-0831


  3. Zika April 26, 2018 webinar - by NaepcA1 (Posted Wed, 18 Apr 2018 15:41:05 GMT)
    Webinar Invitations

    The National Indian Health Board (NIHB) is hosting two upcoming webinars:
    1. Cross-Jurisdictional Considerations for Addressing Zika and Other Public Health Threats
    2. Zika Champions in Indian Country: Spotlight on Three Zika Projects Funded by the National Indian Health Board



    Cross-Jurisdictional Considerations for Addressing Zika and Other Public Health Threats
    Thursday, April 26, 2018 from 4:00-5:00 pm ET
    (Beginning at 3 pm CT, 2 pm MT, 1 pm PT, 12 pm AK)*
    *Note that times may vary if your state or Tribe does not follow major time zone patterns

    Communicating, coordinating, and collaborating with adjacent or overlapping governments can be daunting in the best of situations. Collaboration becomes especially complex when those partnerships get tested in critical public health situations. Many Tribal governments face additional challenges, including the need to educate state and local partners on Tribal sovereignty and jurisdiction, and the status that Tribes and Tribal Epidemiology Centers (TECs) hold as public health authorities.

    Nevertheless, Tribal-State-Local partnerships are valuable and important - especially for emerging public health issues like Zika which can require emergency response as well as interdepartmental and cross-jurisdictional cooperation. Zika concerns multiple stakeholders within Tribal systems - along with other public health allies from state and local health departments - including emergency management, environmental health, and public health, as well as arenas within healthcare systems such as maternal child health, behavioral health, community health, and primary providers. Moreover, disease knows no bounds and collaboration can benefit everyone mutually.

    Using Zika as an example, the National Indian Health Board (NIHB) Deputy Director and Director of Public Health Programs and Policy, Carolyn Angus-Hornbuckle, JD, will discuss benefits to cross-jurisdictional collaboration and tools to use to advance partnerships.

    This webinar is part of the NIHB Zika project and are made possible by funding and support from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

    Presenters
    • Carolyn Angus-Hornbuckle, JD (Mohawk), Deputy Director and Director of Public Health Programs and Policy, National Indian Health Board
    • Angelica Colagreco, MPH, Public Health Project Coordinator, National Indian Health Board
    Audience
    Cross-jurisdictional collaboration concerns multiple stakeholders within Tribal systems as many aspects of Tribal public health can benefit from partnership. This webinar is intended for anyone working in areas related to Zika or other cross-cutting public health threats within Tribal systems.

    Learning Objectives
    By the end of this training, participants will be able to:
    • Discuss the benefits of cross-jurisdictional collaboration
    • Describe tools and practices that can be used to advance partnerships
    Learn more or register HERE


    Zika Champions in Indian Country: Spotlight on Three Zika Projects Funded by the National Indian Health Board
    Friday, May 18, 2018 from 1:00-2:00 pm ET
    (Beginning at 12 pm CT, 11 am MT, 10 am PT, 9 am AK)*
    *Note that times may vary if your state or Tribe does not follow major time zone patterns

    Last summer, the National Indian Health Board (NIHB) announced a funding opportunity that would provide Tribes and Tribal organizations with up to $5000 to tackle one or two high impact, capacity building activities to prepare for the possibility of Zika transmission in Tribal communities. Three awardees received funding: Bishop Paiute Tribe (California), Indian Health Council (California), and Kaw Nation (Oklahoma). These Tribal champions have been striving to address this critical threat in creative ways within their communities and will wrap up their current projects at the end of April 2018.

    "Zika virus has the potential to cause devastating health affects for Tribal communities and the next generation of indigenous children. This funding opportunity can help mobilize Tribes to take action for preparedness and response planning to help keep their communities safe."
    -Stacy Bohlen, Executive Director, National Indian Health Board

    This webinar highlights the three Tribes and their projects' successes, challenges, best practices, lessons learned, and ways that this work may be continued beyond the NIHB funding. Project activities include implementing an education campaign and engaging in vector control activities such as: holding partner meetings, participating in community health fairs, creating educational documents, identifying homes at high risk for mosquito activity, writing newsletter articles, providing Zika training to department leads, and distributing Zika kits.

    This webinar and the NIHB Zika Response and Planning Mini Award program are part of the NIHB Zika project and are made possible by funding and support from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

    Presenters
    • Angelica Colagreco, MPH, Public Health Project Coordinator, National Indian Health Board
    • Anson Black Calf (Navajo, Lakota Sioux), Environmental Technician, Indian Health Council
    • Thomas Gustie (Bishop Paiute), Natural Resource Specialist, Bishop Paiute Tribe Environmental Management Office
    • Francine Hackett (Kaw Nation), MS, IT, BS, Director of Environmental Program, Kaw Nation
    • Angelina Renteria, MA (Navajo Nation), Public Health Programs Director, Project Coordinator, Indian Health Council
    • Rick Romero (Tohono O'odham, Mexican), Elder Fall Specialist, Certified Car Seat Technician, Indian Health Council
    Audience
    Zika is a complex problem that concerns multiple stakeholders within Tribal systems, including emergency management, environmental health, and public health, as well as arenas within healthcare systems such as maternal and child health, behavioral health, community health, and primary care. This webinar is intended for anyone working in areas related to Zika within Tribal systems - particularly representatives of Tribes, organizations, or departments interested in learning about Zika activities or exploring ways to implement Zika prevention or response programs within their own areas.

    Learning Objectives
    By the end of this training, participants will be able to:
    • Discuss the benefits of Zika prevention and response activities
    • Describe three Zika projects taking place in Indian Country
    • Identify successes, challenges, best practices, and lessons learned from these Zika projects
    Learn more or register HERE


    Webinars are held as part of the National Indian Health Board (NIHB) Zika project with support from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Although these webinars focus on Zika information as examples, they also contain information that may be applicable to a variety of Tribal public health issues such as vector control and emergency preparedness.

    Learn more about NIHB's Zika project HERE. You may also post a question or request technical assistance.

    You can find additional information about the upcoming webinars or the Zika project by contacting the Zika Public Health Project Coordinator at acolagreco@nihb.org.


    National Indian Health Board | www.nihb.org
    910 Pennsylvania Avenue SE | Washington, DC 20003 | Phone: 202-507-4070

    Join Our Mailing List


  4. EPA WIFIA Funds Due July 6, 2018 - by NaepcA1 (Posted Wed, 18 Apr 2018 15:38:59 GMT)
    The U.S. EPA is accepting letters of interest (LOIs) for the Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (WIFIA) through July 6. The WIFIA program has $5.5 billion in low cost loans available for water and wastewater infrastructure projects, and is intended to accelerate investment in infrastructure. The LOI is the first step of the application process, and if your project is selected, you will then need to prepare a full application. Eligible applicants include local, state, tribal, and federal government entities, partnership and joint ventures, corporations and trusts, and Clean Water and Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (SRF) programs. More information about the application is available in the notice at the bottom of this email. General information about the WIFIA program is available on the EPA’s website, here: https://www.epa.gov/wifia

    The EPA is hosting a series of webinars for interested applicants, each of which is scheduled from 2-3:30 pm Eastern time (11 am – 12:30 pm Pacific time). You can register for these webinars here: https://www.epa.gov/wifia/wifia-resourc ... tionanchor

    Webinars:
    • April 23 – Submission and selection process for all prospective borrowers
    • April 30 – Submission and selection process for small community prospective borrowers
    • May 2 – Submission and selection process for Tribal prospective borrowers
    • May 30 – Submission and selection process Question and Answer session

    WIFIA Program
    • Deadline: July 6 (note: LOIs are due by noon, Eastern time)
    • Available funding: $5.5 billion
    • Max award: 49% of total project costs
    • Min. project costs: $20 million for large communities (>25,000 people); $5 million for small communities (<25,000 people)
    • Funding match: 20% of project costs in non-federal

    Eligible project types:
    • Projects that are eligible for the Clean Water SRF, notwithstanding the public ownership clause
    • Projects that are eligible for the Drinking Water SRF
    • Enhanced energy efficiency projects at drinking water and wastewater facilities
    • Brackish or seawater desalination, aquifer recharge, alternative water supply, and water recycling projects
    • Drought prevention, reduction, or mitigation projects
    • Acquisition of property if it is integral to the project or will mitigate the environmental impact of a project
    • A combination of projects secured by a common security pledge or submitted under one application by an SRF program


  5. Tribal EPA Conference Oct 30-Nov 1, 2018 - by NaepcA1 (Posted Wed, 18 Apr 2018 15:37:24 GMT)
    see attched